2009 October Mormon General Conference

Fall 2009 Mormon General Conference

It is time once more for the Fall General Conference of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (or the LDS church, or Mormon General Conference). The Mormon general conference will be held October 3-4, and will be broadcast around the globe. The Mormon General Conference will also be available online.

LDS.org is the best source for information on the 2009 October General Conference.

About the Mormon General Conference

Twice a year, the leadership of the Mormon church holds a worldwide general conference. The conference is available in many languages, and is broadcast via satellite, and over the internet. It is available on some cable and TV networks as well.

If you want to learn a little bit about the Mormon church, General Conference is a great way to learn. You can watch from the comfort of your own home, and get an idea of what we believe and teach in our church. If you have any questions afterward, you can ask them on this blog, or on mormon.org, and get a response from a Mormon church member.

The conference also has a segment on statistics concerning the Mormon church, and a report of the church, which is very interesting to watch.

How to Watch the October 2009 Mormon General Conference

You can download a complete program schedule and viewing instructions online. The conference happens Oct 3-4, a Saturday and a Sunday, with several sessions each day. Here is the basic session schedule:

Saturday morning session (live broadcast)

  • MDT: Saturday, October 3, 2009, at 10:00 a.m.
  • UTC: Saturday, October 3, 2009, at 1600

The World Report of The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints (prerecorded, video broadcast only)

  • MDT: Saturday, October 3, 2009, at 12:05 p.m.
  • UTC: Saturday, October 3, 2009, at 1805

Latter-day Saint Edition of the Holy Bible in Spanish
(prerecorded, video broadcast only)

  • MDT: Saturday, October 3, 2009, at 12:35 p.m.
  • UTC: Saturday, October 3, 2009, at 1835

Saturday afternoon session (live broadcast)

  • MDT: Saturday, October 3, 2009, at 2:00 p.m.
  • UTC: Saturday, October 3, 2009, at 2000

Sunday morning session (live broadcast)

  • MDT: Sunday, October 4, 2009, at 10:00 a.m.
  • UTC: Sunday, October 4, 2009, at 1600

The World Report of The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints (rebroadcast, video broadcast only)

  • MDT: Sunday, October 4, 2009, at 12:05 p.m.
  • UTC: Sunday, October 4, 2009, at 1805

Latter-day Saint Edition of the Holy Bible in Spanish
(rebroadcast, video broadcast only)

  • MDT: Sunday, October 4, 2009, at 12:35 p.m.
  • UTC: Sunday, October 4, 2009, at 1835

Sunday afternoon session (live broadcast)

  • MDT: Sunday, October 4, 2009, at 2:00 p.m.
  • UTC: Sunday, October 4, 2009, at 2000
Saturday morning session (live broadcast)
MDT: Saturday, October 3, 2009, at 10:00 a.m.
UTC: Saturday, October 3, 2009, at 1600

The World Report of The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints (prerecorded, video broadcast only)
MDT: Saturday, October 3, 2009, at 12:05 p.m.
UTC: Saturday, October 3, 2009, at 1805

Latter-day Saint Edition of the Holy Bible in Spanish
(prerecorded, video broadcast only)
MDT: Saturday, October 3, 2009, at 12:35 p.m.
UTC: Saturday, October 3, 2009, at 1835

Saturday afternoon session (live broadcast)
MDT: Saturday, October 3, 2009, at 2:00 p.m.
UTC: Saturday, October 3, 2009, at 2000

Sunday morning session (live broadcast)
MDT: Sunday, October 4, 2009, at 10:00 a.m.
UTC: Sunday, October 4, 2009, at 1600

The World Report of The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-day Saints (rebroadcast, video broadcast only)
MDT: Sunday, October 4, 2009, at 12:05 p.m.
UTC: Sunday, October 4, 2009, at 1805

Latter-day Saint Edition of the Holy Bible in Spanish
(rebroadcast, video broadcast only)
MDT: Sunday, October 4, 2009, at 12:35 p.m.
UTC: Sunday, October 4, 2009, at 1835

Sunday afternoon session (live broadcast)
MDT: Sunday, October 4, 2009, at 2:00 p.m.
UTC: Sunday, October 4, 2009, at 2000

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How to find hope in life

There is a new section on LDS.org specifically focused on ideas and stories about finding hope in life. You can visit the new site on Finding hope here:

LDS site on “Finding Hope”

In the Mormon faith, we believe that we can find more hope in our lives by following the teachings of Jesus Christ, and by learning about Him and His life. We also believe that we can find hope through prayer and the Holy Spirit, both very strong connections to our Heavenly Father that are available for all people on the earth to benefit from.

Another great way to find hope is to serve others. When we serve other people, we forget our own problems for a time, and can feel better while helping someone in their own trials. While we can’t always expect Heavenly Father to take away the source of our pain, we can gain hope through service.

Honest in our all our dealings

One of the core principles that the Mormon church teaches is that we should be “honest in our dealings with our fellow man.” This means that we should deal honestly and uprightly in business transactions, work, and in everything we do.

To me, this is important for several reasons. First and foremost, because it helps keep our minds focused on following the Lord’s commandments to not lie or steal. Second, it helps ensure that we are being “examples of the believers, in word and in deed.”

I recently had a discussion with a blog visitor about a situation they had where a member of the Mormon church was not honest in their dealings. The individual they had worked with promised one thing and delivered another. This LDS person had essentially stolen from them, and was refusing to make right what they had done.

While I cannot speak for the situation itself, I can say this: no man or woman can go through this life professing to believe a thing and not live it. If we, as Mormons, profess to be honest and upright, we must live that, or we have no true belief. President N. Eldon Tanner, an early leader in our church, said this:

“Remember always that the gospel is designed to teach us how to conduct ourselves for the benefit of our spiritual and temporal affairs. It is not enough to attend Church meetings, partake of the sacrament, participate in religious discussions, and then turn a deaf ear to the needs of our families, our neighbors, or our communities; or be dishonest or unscrupulous in our dealings with them.”

I am disappointed that the person who contacted me had such an experience as would make them feel that perhaps Mormon people were not what they professed to be. These are real life experiences, and they make an impression. LDS people must live up to the tenets of their faith, if we wish to share with others what we feel about the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

On behalf of that person who made this mistake, I apologize. I hope that the situation comes to a resolution, and that those involved continue to look for understanding. The Mormon faith is one that is open for all to see. If you have questions, please feel free to contact me via this blog any time.

Self-Reliance Beyond Food Storage

Most people know that Mormons store food in case of emergency. We do this so that we can always “be prepared” for whatever life might bring. Mormons have been doing it for years, but the practice goes back to biblical times. People have always been better off when they are prepared to take care of themselves.

What most people don’t know is that the Mormon church teaches self-reliance in more than just food storage. The LDS church teaches its members that they should be self-reliant in the following areas:

  • Education: Mormons are told that they should get as much education as possible. This starts with the basics; reading, writing, and math. It stems to communication skills, and many other areas. We are taught that the more we can learn, the better off we’ll be in this life, and the more able we will be to take care of ourselves and others.
  • Physical health: In the Mormon church we have a teaching called the “Word of Wisdom.” It was given to us in 1833, and it warns against the dangers of tobacco, smoking, drinking, and using addictive substances. It speaks about the health benefits of eating right and exercising. We try to follow these basic principles to be physically health.
  • Employment: We are taught in the Mormon faith that we should prepare and train for a good job that interests us and meets our financial needs. Training and skill building is encouraged as part of self-reliance in employment. We are also taught that we should give an honest day’s work to our employer.
  • Home storage: This is where the food storage comes in. You can read more about it on my food storage page.
  • Resource management: Avoiding debt and saving for the future has long been a teaching in the Mormon church.  We are taught to give generously to the poor, and to pay all of our obligations. We are encouraged to avoid wasting our time, talents and other resources, by budgeting and managing ourselves to the best of our ability.
  • Spiritual, emotional and social strength: These areas are developed as we build relationships with our family members and friends, and as we continue to learn and grow in the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

By working hard and dedicating oneself to being self-reliant in these areas, we are better prepared to help others while on this earth. On the other hand, if we don’t work hard and manage our time, talents, money and other resources, we won’t ever have the opportunity or ability to help others. Being self-reliant gives individuals, families, and nations, the ability to care for others in the way the Lord has outlined; through charity and love, springing up out of the heart.

What matters most

This is just a short video reminding us to spend our time on those things that matter most: the people in our lives. It is a beautiful message, worth the few moments it will take from your day to watch it.

I hope we all can show and express our love for those around us more frequently. After all that is said and done, our influence on those we walk this earth with will be one of the few things that carries through to the world beyond.

Having faith in troubled times

It can be difficult to have faith during hard times. It may feel like things will never get better, and hope might seem too far out of reach to grasp. We can have hope, even when things are at their worst.

Despair can come into our lives for a variety of reasons. It may be from something we did, something we witnessed, or something that happened to us. Despair can come after the death of a loved one, long-term unemployment, or from a variety of other triggers.

No matter what the cause, the solution can be the same. Having faith in the Lord Jesus Christ can help lift us out of despair and hopelessness. In the Mormon church, we profess to:

“follow the admonition of Paul—We believe all things, we fhope all things, we have endured many things, and hope to be able to gendure all things.” Articles of Faith, 13

The coupling of the word hope and the word endure is no accident. It can take a great deal of endurance to make it through difficult times. But it can be done, when we put our faith in Jesus Christ.

President Dieter F. Uchtdorf, a leader in the Mormon church, recently made the following statements:

Hope is one leg of a three-legged stool, together with faith and charity. These three stabilize our lives regardless of the rough or uneven surfaces we might encounter at the time.

The adversary uses despair to bind hearts and minds in suffocating darkness. Despair drains from us all that is vibrant and joyful and leaves behind the empty remnants of what life was meant to be. Despair kills ambition, advances sickness, pollutes the soul, and deadens the heart. Despair can seem like a staircase that leads only and forever downward.

Hope, on the other hand, is like the beam of sunlight rising up and above the horizon of our present circumstances. It pierces the darkness with a brilliant dawn. It encourages and inspires us to place our trust in the loving care of an eternal Heavenly Father, who has prepared a way for those who seek for eternal truth in a world of relativism, confusion, and of fear.

Just as despair may touch all of our lives, the hope that comes from the knowledge of the Plan of Heavenly Father may be ours if we will hear and understand it. That Plan is contained in the Holy Scriptures. It is in the Bible, and it is reiterated in the Book of Mormon.

That Plan of Happiness, also known as the Gospel, outlines how we might pass through this “veil of tears,” that we call mortal life, and return to live with our Heavenly Father in peace and repose again after this life. Everyone who comes to this earth will have an opportunity to embrace the Gospel, even if they don’t have the opportunity to do so while on the earth.

When we embrace the Gospel, we do all that we can to live in accordance with its teachings. We first have faith, and we let that faith work in us toward the goal of repenting from our sins. With repentance comes baptism by immersion by one having authority, which washes us “as clean as the driven snow.” This is the gift of the Gospel, and the gift that our Savior Jesus Christ provided for us through His life and death here on the earth.

Once baptized, we continue in faith, enduring til the end. But we are not alone. The Holy Spirit can be our constant companion, to lead and guide us in this life. We can feel that Spirit as truth comes to us, and it can be a source of strength to us in our darkest hours.

Despair will come, but the hope and light of the Gospel can dispel any darkness. I know that through faith, I have been able to overcome the darkest times in my life. I know that through that same faith, I will be able to overcome all things. I also know that anyone else can do the same.

Please feel free to ask any questions you wish about Mormonism, the Plan of Happiness, or the Gospel of Jesus Christ. I’ll do my best to answer on this site. The LDS missionaries are also available for appointments or just to answer questions, or get free materials to read or watch on mormon.org or lds.org.

True Welfare is the Pure Love of Christ

Many people have heard of the Mormon Church Welfare program. The LDS church has humanitarian efforts that span the globe, and an outreach that touches communities and individuals in all walks of life, and not just those who are of our faith.

When people hear the word “welfare,” they often think about handouts, checks from the government, or help for the needy. While these kinds of aid can be considered a part of serving those in need, the word “welfare” encompasses a much broader range of concerns: spiritual well-being, temporal or physical well-being, job security, self-respect, self-discipline, and self-reliance.

Welfare is complete when the giver and the receiver are both blessed for their dedication to the principles of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Jesus Christ, while on the earth, gave us wonderful examples of caring for the poor. The scriptures are full of examples that show us that we must, to be followers of Christ, care for the poor. This means that we must not only help with temporal, but also help with the “poor in heart,” the meek, and the lonely.

Real charity cannot be forced, or extracted from the masses and administered by a government program: it must spring forth actively from the hearts of individuals, spontaneous, and as a willful following of the Spirit.

In the LDS church we do have organized programs, but our giving, whether it be volunteer time, or funds, is always done by our own free will and choice.  We are taught what we should do, and we are expected to be active in participating, without been directed in all things.

If you have more questions about the LDS church welfare system or programs, LDS.org and Providentliving.org are wonderful resources to get you started in learning more. Otherwise, feel free to ask your questions here!

A new LDS temple in Phoenix, AZ

Phoenix Arizona, the nations 5th largest city and one of the fastest growing, will soon be home to a new LDS temple. This new addition, which will be built in North Phoenix, will be one of less than 200 temples in the entire world.

The LDS church has a long history in Arizona, where they settled and irrigated much of what was otherwise uninhabitable in the late 1800’s. The LDS temple in Mesa, AZ was completed in 1927, and is still there today.

LDS temples are beautiful, and their relative rarity makes them a draw for local economies. Where they are built housing and tourism markets always improve.

Mormons strive to be a very family and community oriented people. We strive to live in a way that is beneficial to our cities, countries and local communities. We generally participate in programs like Scouting, and are encouraged to spend time doing community service.

If you have questions about the North Phoenix temple that is being planned, please feel free to post them here!

Mesa Arizona LDS Temple

Mesa Arizona LDS Temple

Finding hope, and the memory of 9/11

Here is a video from lds.org which shows a 9/11 survivor and his story. He shares his memories of that day and his escape from one of the falling towers, and then  speaks about the difficulties he faced for years following 9/11.

The hope that this man found was in Christ, and his ability to care for each of us, and make us whole. We each have a need to be whole, and only our Savior can meet that need by making up for our lacks and mistakes.

This is a good video, and a good reminder of what happened on 9/11, and how it affected the world, and each of us individually. During this time of remembering, I hope everyone will turn their lives more toward Christ, and his teachings.